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dc.contributor.advisorLloyd, David
dc.contributor.authorFenoglio, Peter James
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:51:26Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:51:26Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2029
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/367225
dc.description.abstractThis project explores and presents the dimensions of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related stigma, which I argue is one of the main impediments to initiating, and succeeding in, HIV prevention. Beyond Stigma investigates the impact of HIV-related stigma on social, family and community groups and individuals, and the possible resulting changes in cultural behaviour. It argues that exploring the impact of HIV-related stigma on people living with HIV (PLHIV) through visual-art research functions as a cultural action that clarifies associated issues of stigmatisation. Instigating conversations about these issues through conceptually mediated social-commentary artwork forms the core of the research. The research comprises an exploratory and experiential study using a convenience sample, and an extensive self-incidental gathering of data, both of which are founded in heuristic methodology. The convenience sample used consists of adults who acquired HIV, or have been influenced by HIV-related stigma, including myself. The research in this study combines both empirical and theoretical approaches of heuristic research and seeks to capture and disseminate felt, or tacit, knowledge. This expressed and felt knowledge enables me to unify the field activities, the individual experience, and the art practice activities into visual-art research. The artworks establish meaning through image and association, acknowledging the challenges faced by PLHIV. Stigma and discrimination still play a significant role in the lives of PLHIV, affecting their confidence, self-esteem, and quality of life. As a result, significant manifestations of these effects are evident in the literature and in the contributors’ stories, and are demonstrated as harmful to the psychological wellbeing of PLHIV. Manifestations such as isolation, protection, contamination, disclosure, avoidance, ostracism, exclusion, rejection, blaming, assumptions, difference and indifference are the foundations for my mediated creative outcomes. These outcomes provide a dynamic cultural medium for investigating ongoing conversations of empathy and understanding.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsHuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related stigma
dc.subject.keywordsPeople living with HIV (PLHIV)
dc.subject.keywordsSocial stigma
dc.subject.keywordsSocial discrimination
dc.titleBeyond Stigma: What is it to be HIV-Positive
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorDrew, Marian
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1417649682699
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentQueensland College of Art
gro.griffith.authorFenoglio, Peter James


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