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dc.contributor.convenorMervi Ilmonen & Peter Acheen_AU
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Careyen_US
dc.contributor.authorScheurer, Janen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.editorMervi Ilmonen & Peter Acheen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:19:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:19:54Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-27T06:56:53Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36733
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses the transport planning issues that are exposed when new accessibility tools have been employed, designed to address the challenge of providing accessibility by public transport as a serious alternative to car use. Research from case studies in Perth and Brisbane is reported. The paper discusses the benefits of focussing on metropolitan-wide supply side modelling as opposed to simply applying demand forecasts; the need to, and challenges of, setting benchmarks that define quality public transport and accessibility; the need for iterative review by setting long term visions and back-casting as well as looking forward from current city structures. The analysis has raised some interesting questions. It is evident that the past practice of incremental and ad hoc changes to the public transport network will not meet Australia's transport challenges in a timely fashion. What is needed is a step-change, but this requires both a long term view of future city size and structure (a challenge for land use planners who have thus far not planned in this way) and considerable public funding in the short term (where public transport has traditionally been underfunded relative to private transport). It is questionable whether the required rate of change can be achieved.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent764638 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNo data provideden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://aesop2010.tkk.fi/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename24th Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP) Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the 24th Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP) Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-07-10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-07-14en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAalto University, Finlanden_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Studies (excl. Planning)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160404en_US
dc.titleThe dead end of demand modelling: supplying a futures-based public transport planen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE2 - Conference Publications (Non HERDC Eligible)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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