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dc.contributor.authorThite, Mohanen_US
dc.contributor.editorDr Stephen Gibben_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T17:44:28Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T17:44:28Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.modified2009-09-25T04:45:45Z
dc.identifier.issn13620436en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/EUM0000000005986en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/3676
dc.description.abstractToday's boundary-less and knowledge-based economy with its focus on learning organization delivers a contradictory message to employees in managing their careers. On the one hand, contemporary organizations expect and demand that employees adopt a lifelong learning approach, be global-oriented, successfully manage the dynamics of diversity in the work and marketplace, work in self-directed teams, develop a feel for and rapid response to fast changing customer expectations and so on. On the other hand, organizations are silent on the question of who is going to bear the enormous cost of ongoing technical and behavioral training that the employees need to successfully manage in a global village. While today individuals accept the fact that they can no more expect the organizations to provide them lifelong, full-time and stable careers, they would certainly prefer not to work for organizations that adopt the "help us but help yourself" attitude to career management. This paper discusses the implications of this paradox on the career management process at the organizational level and reviews best practice scenarios.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEmeralden_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/1362-0436.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom312en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto317en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCareer Development Internationalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350201en_US
dc.titleHelp us but help yourself: The paradox of contemporary career managementen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.date.issued2001
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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