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dc.contributor.advisorXu, Zhihong
dc.contributor.authorIbell, Paula Therese
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T02:58:01Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T02:58:01Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/3314
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/367975
dc.description.abstractPost-planting silviculture in the exotic pine plantations of Southeast Queensland focuses on fertilisation and weed control at early plantation establishment. Early establishment silviculture in pine plantations aims to reduce the competition for light, nutrients and water in the short term, while maximising resource conversion for growth in the long term. However, silviculture can be applied in a systematic way without necessarily considering the limitations to maximum tree growth at each site. Accordingly, silvicultural treatments could be applied in a site specific manner to better reflect the limitations to tree growth at each site (e.g. nutrition and/or water), or for maximum effectiveness based on seasonal limitations (e.g. weed competition, water availability). This research aimed to investigate the effects of early establishment weed control and fertilisation practices on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling (as an indicator of soil fertility), tree nutrition (particularly N nutrition), growth and eco-physiological responses, in the F1 hybrid exotic pine plantations (Pinus elliottii Engelm var. elliottii x Pinus caribaea Morelet var. hondurensis (Sènècl.) W.H.G. Barett & Golfari.) in the subtropics of Southeast Queensland.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsWeed control
dc.subject.keywordsPost-planting silviculture
dc.subject.keywordsHybrid pine plantations
dc.subject.keywordsPine plantations
dc.titleEdaphic and Ecophysiological Responses to Early Establishment Weed Control and Fertilisation in F1 Hybrid Pine Plantations of Southeast Queensland
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technology
gro.description.notepublicIn order to comply with copyright the published article in Appendix 4 has not been published here.
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBlumfield, Tim
dc.contributor.otheradvisorChaseling, Janet
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1428549966197
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environment
gro.griffith.authorIbell, Paula T.


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