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dc.contributor.authorThompson, Carleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Annaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:44:45Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:44:45Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2014-08-28T05:05:23Z
dc.identifier.issn03600025en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11199-010-9911-2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36813
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated gender differences in the perpetration of stalking violence and how sociocultural beliefs may account for these differences/similarities. A sample of 293 Australian undergraduate and postgraduate students classified as relational stalkers completed a self-report questionnaire assessing violence perpetration (no/moderate/severe violence) and sociocultural beliefs (justifications for relational violence; assessments of target fear). Female relational stalkers perpetrated elevated rates of moderate violence; however, there were no gender differences for severe violence. Both male and female relational stalkers were more supportive of justifications for female-perpetrated relational violence than male-perpetrated relational violence. Violent male relational stalkers were more likely to believe they caused fear/harm than their female counterparts. These findings are interpreted in the context of sociocultural beliefs that view male-to-female violence as more unacceptable and harmful than female-to-male violence.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent194894 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom351en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto365en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5-6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSex Rolesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume66en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchStudies in Human Society not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode169999en_US
dc.titleAre Female Stalkers More Violent Than Male Stalkers? Understanding Gender Differences in Stalking Violence Using Contemporary Sociocultural Beliefsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Sex Roles, 68148. Sex Roles is available online at: http://www.springerlink.com/ with the open URL of your article.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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