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dc.contributor.advisorKitching, Roger
dc.contributor.authorMaunsell, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T04:45:59Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T04:45:59Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/3017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/368145
dc.description.abstractGradients in elevation are used to understand how species respond to changes in local climatic conditions and are therefore a powerful tool for predicting how mountain ecosystems may respond to climate change. While many studies have shown elevational patterns in species richness and species turnover, little is known about how multi-species interactions respond to elevation. An understanding of how species interactions are affected by current clines in climate is imperative if we are to make predictions about how ecosystem function and stability will be affected by climate change. This challenge has been addressed here by focussing on a set of intimately interacting species: leaf-mining insects, their host plants and their parasitoid predators. Herbivorous insects, including leaf miners, and their host plants and parasitoids interact in diverse and complex ways, but relatively little is known about how the nature and strengths of these interactions change along climatic gradients. In order to determine how elevational changes in climatic conditions affect interactions among leaf miners, their host plants and their parasitoids, I quantified these communities and their interactions along three elevational gradients in eastern Australian subtropical rainforest. In doing so, I aimed to 1) provide information on host plant use of leaf miners and the elevational associations of these relationships, 2) understand how the species richness and assemblage composition leaf miners and their parasitoids, and composition of interactions with their hosts (plants or leaf miners), is affected by elevation, 3) uncover any elevational changes in the structure of quantitative networks connecting leaf miners and their parasitoids, and 4) test if parasitism pressure increases at the lower edge of, and below the elevational range of a specific leaf miner species.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsFood webs
dc.subject.keywordsSub tropical rainforest ecosystem
dc.subject.keywordsElevation in sub tropical rainforest ecology
dc.subject.keywordsLeaf-mining insects
dc.subject.keywordsParasitoids
dc.titleFood Webs along Elevational Gradients: Interactions among Leaf Miners, Host Plants and Parasitoids in Australian Subtropical Rainforest
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technology
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBurwell, Christopher
dc.rights.accessRightsPublic
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1445238035891
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentGriffith School of Environment
gro.griffith.authorMaunsell, Sarah C.


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