Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, Kristina
dc.contributor.advisorStenning, Philip
dc.contributor.authorAkinlabi, Oluwagbenga Michael
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T04:46:09Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T04:46:09Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/368175
dc.description.abstractThis thesis makes a number of contributions to the literature on procedural justice and police legitimacy. It does so using a sample of respondents from Nigeria. It explores whether public perceptions of procedural justice are more or less influential than perceptions of police effectiveness in determining whether police will be perceived as legitimate, and by extension, foster people’s self-reported willingness to voluntary comply with the law and cooperate with police. Studies mostly from US, UK, and Australia strongly suggest police legitimacy as a mediating factor between perceptions of procedural justice and self-reported law-abiding behaviour (such as compliance with the law and willingness to cooperate with police). However, this perspective contradicts findings from Africa; here, studies show that police are most likely to engender legitimacy or motivate compliance related behaviour when the police are perceived to be effective in crime control, use sanction, and threats of force. The findings of the current thesis support both perspectives.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
dc.subject.keywordsPolicing, Nigeria
dc.subject.keywordsLaw and order, Nigeria
dc.titlePolicing in a Lawless Society: A Study of Police Legitimacy and Procedural Justice in Nigeria
dc.typeGriffith thesis
dc.date.embargoEnd2018-10-11
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.identifier.gurtIDgu1494557620869
gro.source.ADTshelfnoADT0
gro.source.GURTshelfnoGURT
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.griffith.authorAkinlabi, Oluwagbenga M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record