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dc.contributor.authorDissanayaka, Nadeekaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSellbach, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatheson, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorD. O'Sullivan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSilburn, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Byrne, Gerarden_US
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMellick, Georgeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:47:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:47:03Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-07T08:51:59Z
dc.identifier.issn08853185en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mds.22833en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/36823
dc.description.abstractAnxiety disorders are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, yet are poorly studied. We examined the prevalence of anxiety disorders in PD, investigated the association between anxiety, and presentation and progression of PD, and studied for the first time the contribution of putative risk factors for anxiety in PD. A case-series of 79 PD patients recruited from neurology out-patient clinics was examined for anxiety disorders using the DSM-IV criteria. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Hoehn and Yahr Staging of PD were employed to understand the relationship between anxiety disorders, and the clinical presentation and severity of PD. A validated survey assessed putative risk factors for anxiety in PD. Twenty-five percent of PD patients were diagnosed with anxiety. Panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder and social phobia were prevalent anxiety disorders. Comorbid depression with anxiety was observed (14%). The severity but not the duration of PD was positively related to anxiety. PD patients with postural instability and gait dysfunction symptom clustering were more likely to experience anxiety than tremor-dominant patients. While levodopa dosage had no relationship to anxiety, experience of dyskinesias or on/off fluctuations increased the risk. Lateralisation of PD had no association with anxiety. Anxiety disorders decreased with age and young onset PD patients were more likely to experience anxiety than the late onset subjects. Anxiety adds to the complexity of PD, lowering patients' quality of life. Future research can be directed to identify reactive and organic nature of anxiety in PD. 頲010 Movement Disorder Societyen_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom838en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto845en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMovement Disordersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399en_US
dc.titleAnxiety disorders in Parkinson's disease: Prevalence and risk factorsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the authors for more information.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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