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dc.contributor.authorRenshaw, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-19T04:47:15Z
dc.date.available2018-02-19T04:47:15Z
dc.date.created2002-11-07T00:00:00Zen_US
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/368685
dc.description.abstractThe power of communication systems to connect people to each other and to diverse sources of information is seen as enhancing learning in quite profound ways. From a social justice perspective, however, disparities between and within nations in the distribution of educational resources and opportunities appear to be amplified by the new technologies rather than reduced, so accessibility remains a pressing concern. The vision of a global learning community, nonetheless, is a seductive one – a fusion of desire for security and growth, for community and learning – and it has been readily exploited by media and telecommunication companies in their advertisements. However, web-mediated learning and the virtual communities created across time and space, are also regarded with suspicion, as ‘unruly’, ‘out of control’ and ‘dangerous’ because they enable instant access to information from diverse sources across the globe, information that may be unreliable, malevolent, myopic or misleading. Professor Renshaw begins this lecture, then, with these double-sided reflections on the beguiling words – learning and community - and suggest that as educators we need to explicate in words and in practice, a vision of community that is worth learning towards.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProfessorial Lecture Series No. 8en_US
dc.titleCommunity and Learningen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2002 Griffith Universityen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.departmentSchool of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.griffith.authorRenshaw, Peter D.


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    Contains the Griffith Professorial Lecture Series for the period 1995 to 2005.

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