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dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Kim-Huong
dc.contributor.authorSellars, Marcus
dc.contributor.authorAgar, Meera
dc.contributor.authorKurrle, Sue
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Adele
dc.contributor.authorComans, Tracy
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-20T12:31:06Z
dc.date.available2018-03-20T12:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12913-017-2748-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/369842
dc.description.abstractBackground: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of planning for future health and personal care. A person’s values and preferences are made known so that they can guide decision making at a future time when that person cannot make or communicate his or her decisions. This is particularly relevant for people with dementia because their ability to make decisions progressively deteriorates over time. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of delivering a nationwide ACP program within the Australian primary care setting. Methods: A decision analytic model was developed to identify the costs and outcomes of an ACP program for people aged 65+ years who were at risk of developing dementia. Inputs for the model was sourced and estimated from the literature. The reliability of the results was thoroughly tested in sensitivity analyses. Results: The results showed that, compared to usual care, a nationwide ACP program for people aged 65+ years who were at risk of dementia would be cost-effective. However, the results only hold if ACP completion is higher than 50% and adherence to ACP wishes is above 75%. Conclusions: A nationwide ACP program in the primary care setting is a cost-effective or cost-saving intervention compared to usual care in a population at-risk of developing dementia. Cost savings are generated from providing treatment and care that is consistent with patient preferences, resulting in fewer hospitalisations and less-intensive care at end-of-life.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom797-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto797-8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Health Services Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLibrary and Information Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0807
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleAn economic model of advance care planning in Australia: a cost-effective way to respect patient choice
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicine
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNguyen, Kim-Huong
gro.griffith.authorComans, Tracy


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