Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWanna, John
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-18T23:02:53Z
dc.date.available2018-03-18T23:02:53Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/369927
dc.description.abstractCiting extracts from nearly 350 years ago, Professor Wanna questions how much has really changed in accounting for public spending. The lecture concludes that the key issue is to bring forward the debate about strategic directions and use this to inform budgetary decision-making. Some Canadian and US governments have attempted to use community-inspired strategic directions to inform budget choices and provide performance targets for public officials. Some have come from the right (like Alberta) with an austerity strategy and certain moral stances (for example, governments have accepted the goal of reducing the number of young single parents). Others have come from a more social democratic bent (Saskatchewan, Wisconsin, New Jersey) where the goals are about economic adjustment, community ­building and living standards. Very few people in Australia could name a single strategy that has informed the federal government's overall budgetary stance other than sound financial management since the days of Whitlam and his social spending commitments. The challenge for government today is to develop a sense of direction, win some community acceptance and use this as a basis for planning and deploying its resources.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProfessorial Lecture Series No. 9en_US
dc.titleOne step forward - Two steps back? Do governments spend our money better?en_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2001 Griffith Universityen_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWanna, John


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Other
    Contains the Griffith Professorial Lecture Series for the period 1995 to 2005.

Show simple item record