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dc.contributor.advisorHartwig, Kay
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xuanlu
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-02T06:43:01Z
dc.date.available2018-03-02T06:43:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1210
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/370436
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this research is to understand Queensland secondary school music teachers’ beliefs about technology integration and the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) component in the recently introduced Australian Curriculum: The Arts-Music. Previous research on technology integration indicated that many teachers might be reluctant to use technology resources in music teaching or have misunderstandings about technology integration. Moreover, some studies assumed many music teachers have negative attitudes towards the Australian Curriculum. It is imperative to understand teachers' beliefs and identify the significant barriers of technology integration in order to effectively implement the Australian Curriculum. This research employs qualitative case study method and uses Inductive Thematic Analysis to determine the significant factors that influence teachers' beliefs. Six teachers participated in one-to-one semi-structured interviews. Findings show teachers generally have high level understandings about technology integration according to the Stages of Concerns descriptions in the Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM); Teachers provided positive responses about the curriculum, but they showed no immediate intention to implement the curriculum. Teachers also reported technology integration barriers including financial limitation, insufficient learning opportunities, and lacking institutional support. The discussion argues that the teachers are yet to be familiar with the curriculum, and the reasons include a lack of school administration’s support, and teachers are considering a practical implementation plan. It is also difficult for many schools to substantially change the existing music programs without significant demands or advantages. The research analysed the barriers to future technology integration and found insufficient leadership and technical support are important first-order barriers. More importantly, teachers’ beliefs about technology integration are closely associated with their previous study experience and the quality of current professional development opportunities. Recommendations are provided for teachers, school leaders, and curriculum agencies including taking a teacher self-assessment of ICT learning needs, providing on-demand professional development opportunities and institutional support, and offering guidance for curriculum implementation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian curriculum
dc.subject.keywordsICT integration
dc.subject.keywordsMusic education
dc.subject.keywordsTeacher beliefs
dc.subject.keywordsCBAM
dc.subject.keywordsTechnologies
dc.titleICT Integration in the New Arts Curriculum: Queensland Music Teachers' Perceptions
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorBarton, Georgina
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (Masters)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramMaster of Education and Professional Studies Research (MEdProfStRes)
gro.departmentSchool Educ & Professional St
gro.griffith.authorHu, Xuanlu


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