Show simple item record

dc.contributor.convenorDr Rosemary Hawker & Assoc. Prof. Ross Woodrowen_AU
dc.contributor.authorHobson, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.editorRosemary Hawker, Ass. Prof. Ross Woodrowen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:27:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:27:24Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2011-10-05T07:10:22Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37053
dc.description.abstractThe paper examines the author's recent self-portraits (produced between 2000-2008) in relation to the rabbit as his muse, his emigration to Australia in 2000, and a life-long desire to find the mythical place called 'home'. The self-portraits challenge the masculine identities projected over time onto the nature of the rabbit, through its use in making hats, such as the iconic Akubra brand, and the rabbit's denigration in Australia as a European pest. The paper argues that these artistic representations of 'rabbit hats' offer an unseen psychic rift in their relationship to the Australian male 'battler' and traditional notions of masculinity associated with the tough hardwearing hat and their owners. The paper evidences that in many other cultures the mythological status of the rabbit (and the hare) is seen as feminine, and inclined to self-sacrifice. The self-portraits reflect these attributes, as the ubiquitous Australian hat becomes playfully and perversely 'feminised' through the anthropomorphic development of breasts that protrude through the hat's crown, as well as sporting pendulous ears that often loll over the hat's brim. Furthermore, the paper recognises that while the self-portraits seek to reframe the Australian hat, and thereby challenge its cultural position, they also allude to the self-sacrificial nature of the rabbit muse and suggest that self-sacrifice is a consequence of embracing the inherent meanings attributable to the artworks and the tasks of rabbits and men in Australia today.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent35459 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNo data provideden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/art-association-australia-new-zealand-annual-conferenceen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://aaanz.info/aaanz-home/conferences/conference-2008-aaanz-alpha-alpha-alpha-november-zulu/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAAANZ: The Art Association of Australia and New Zealand Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAAANZ: The Art Association of Australia and New Zealand Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2008-12-04en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2008-12-06en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionNen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArt Theoryen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode190103en_US
dc.titleRabbits, Hats and Male Identity: An Artist’s Ruminations on Anthropomorphized Bunnies and Self-Portraitureen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland College of Arten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2008 Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAAZN). The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record