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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Michael
dc.contributor.authorForde, James Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-14T06:23:40Z
dc.date.available2018-03-14T06:23:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1971
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/371139
dc.description.abstractOver the last twenty years a wealth of scholarship has highlighted the wide-ranging effects of the Haitian Revolution throughout the Atlantic world in the nineteenth century. In particular, studies have asserted the impact that the Revolution had on abolitionist debates and perceptions of race, particularly in America and Britain. This thesis builds on this scholarship by exploring how the early Haitian state and its first leaders were represented in American and British discourses following Haiti’s Declaration of Independence in 1804. While studies have already highlighted how Haiti’s attempts to establish its political sovereignty were severely hampered by American and British reactions to the prospect of black political leadership, this study suggests that race was only one factor in these transatlantic receptions. Indeed, Haitian leaders in the first twenty years of its independence became key reference points in American and British discussions of the foundations of political legitimacy. This thesis explores how Haiti and its early leaders were represented in American and British newspapers, periodicals, literary texts and images. It proposes that reactions to the emergence of the Haitian state were as driven by the domestic political discourses and tensions of America and Britain in the early nineteenth century as they were by ideas of race. Ultimately this study argues that by exploring the different discourses to which Haiti contributed leads to a more nuanced understanding of the reasons behind Haiti’s struggle to gain official diplomatic recognition from America and Britain in its formative years, and also a better understanding of how American and British commentators were formulating arguments regarding effective, progressive and legitimate governance in the early nineteenth century.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsPost-revolution Haiti
dc.subject.keywordsBlack political leadership
dc.subject.keywordsEarly Haitian State
dc.titlePost-Revolution Haiti and the Question of Legitimate Governance: American and British Representations of the Early Haitian State, 1804-1824
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorDenney, Peter
dc.contributor.otheradvisorKaisary, Philip
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Hum, Lang & Soc Sc
gro.griffith.authorForde, James A.


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