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dc.contributor.authorFinnane, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Jonathanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:17:31Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:17:31Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-08-11T06:03:25Z
dc.identifier.issn00048658en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1375/acri.43.2.238en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37152
dc.description.abstractDuring the long era of 'protection' (enacted in 1897, flourishing in the inter-war years and with effects continuing to this day) policy towards Australian Indigenous people suspected of inter-personal violence was ambiguous in its objectives and its means. Formally Indigenous peoples in Australia were British subjects entitled to the full protection of the law. As a consequence violence between Indigenous people was made visible through the conduct of inquests, police inquiries and in many cases subsequent arrest and charge with a criminal offence. Disposal of those charged or even suspected of crimes reflects tension between the universalising presumptions of the criminal law and the particularising effects of welfare regimes that ruled the lives of Indigenous people. Drawing on archives of inquests, courts and prisons in the Queensland jurisdiction before 1940, this article examines the policies and decision-making that characterised a state which remained determinedly colonial in its practises and ambitions. In conclusion, we consider briefly the question of how distinctive or how representative was Queensland practice as a state response to Indigenous violence during these decades of colonial subordination.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent178463 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom238en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto262en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume43en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Historyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCourts and Sentencingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210301en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160203en_US
dc.titleAboriginal violence and state response: histories, policies, legacies in Queensland 1860-1940en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 SAGE Publications. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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