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dc.contributor.convenorSelvaraj Velayuthamen_AU
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorHourigan, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.editorS. Velayutham, N. Ebert and S. Watkinsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:07:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:07:11Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-11T05:52:56Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.soc.mq.edu.au/tasa-conference/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37157
dc.description.abstractShopping has been an emblematic and often decisive social practice for theoretical interpretations of authenticity, lifestyle and commodification in both modern and postmodern conceptions of consumption. The history, politics and indeed mythologies of consumption have frequently been examined through conceptual frames which focus on shopping spaces such as the arcade, the shopping mall and even the airport terminal or cruise liner, and through shopping-oriented social types such as the fl⮥ur or the shopper zombie. Though consumption studies has to a large extent moved away from the shopping mall and its disputed affects to questions of objects and networked systems of consumption practices, an important reality of contemporary consumer culture remains the fact that shopping is a significant leisure activity for many people. In part, this is because such shopping combines search, acquisition and purchase with the apparent pleasures of sociality associated with drifting through shopping spaces. In this paper we draw upon quantitative evidence from a representative sample of Australian citizens to explore patterns of recreational shopping engagement. Our data illustrates the characteristics of recreational shopping in the context of the usual social survey variables, as well as relevant theoretical questions of desire, sociality, anxiety, ethics and self-identity.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent159630 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMacquarie Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeSydneyen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.soc.mq.edu.au/tasa-conference/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleSocial Causes, Private Livesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-12-06en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-12-09en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMacquarie University, North Ryde, Sydneyen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160801en_US
dc.titleAn Exploration of Orientations, Practices and Attitudes Toward Shopping in Australiaen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to TASA website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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