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dc.contributor.convenorMichael Hannanen_AU
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Gemmaen_US
dc.contributor.editorMichael Hannanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:17:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:17:14Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-20T06:47:39Z
dc.identifier.refuriwww.isme.orgen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37163
dc.description.abstractStudent performance matters. While this is true across the entire spectrum of education, it is especially true for Conservatoire students. The ability to triumph in performative events - recitals, concerts, competitions - is the unequivocal marker of an excellent Conservatoire student, and by implication, the marker of excellent teaching of that student in their chosen place of learning. The excellent teacher, who 'produced' the excellent student, certainly in the logic of the traditional Conservatoire, is presumed to be one who is expert in introducing the student apprentice into the mysteries, rigours and pleasures of excellent performance by being themselves an excellent musical practitioner - a model of what it means to perform at the highest level. What follows in this paper is not a rejection of the value of performance or the value of master-apprentice pedagogy, but a reflection on the extent to which learning and performing may in fact stand in opposition to each other, particularly when performance is deemed to be the only measure of a successful education. I would like to highlight some recent research and scholarship that opens up this idea more fully, in order to understand what the implications might be for academic teaching in the Conservatoire and make a case that 'master-apprentice' teaching might take its place in a more diverse field of pedagogical practice rather than dominating that field.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent260217 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherInternational Society for Music Education (ISME)en_US
dc.publisher.placeNedlands, Western Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://issuu.com/official_isme/docs/2010_ceprom_proceedingsen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameThe Musician in Creative and Educational Spaces of the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleThe Musician in Creative and Educational Spaces in the 21st Century. Proceedings from the 18th International Seminar of the Commission for the Education of the Professional Musician (CEPROM)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-07-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-07-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationShanghai, Chinaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titlePerformance or learning? Reflections on pedagogical practices within the Conservatoireen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatoriumen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 ISME. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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