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dc.contributor.authorKyriakis, Constantinos S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Mingen_US
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Stefanen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Les P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShim, Byoung-Shiken_US
dc.contributor.authorChocallo, Anna H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Jarod M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJia, MingRuien_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Dongen_US
dc.contributor.authorTripp, Ralph A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-29T12:30:36Z
dc.date.available2018-10-29T12:30:36Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.issn1873-2542en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vetmic.2017.10.016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/371974
dc.description.abstractSwine influenza A virus (IAV) can cause widespread respiratory disease with high morbidity, low mortality, and have a substantial economic impact to the swine industry. Swine infection may contribute to pandemic IAV given their susceptibility to both avian and human IAVs. Currently, three IAV subtypes (H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2) circulate in swine in North America frequently combining gene segments from avian or human viruses. This study investigated the prevalence of IAV in commercial swine herds. A total of 1878 oral fluid samples were collected from pigs of all ages from 201 commercial farms located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Sixty-eight oral fluid samples from 35 farms were positive by MP gene PCR with an overall IAV-positivity of 3.6%. On the herd level, the percentage of IAV positivity was 17.4%. Fifty-six viruses were subtyped, while 12 were partly subtyped or not subtyped at all. Using de novo assembly, complete sequences were obtained for 59 HA genes. The majority of IAVs subtyped had an H1 HA demonstrating a considerable prevalence over H3 viruses. Furthermore, only six out of eleven HA types were detected which has implications for the selection of vaccines used by swine producers in the region.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom174en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto179en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalVeterinary Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume211en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060599en_US
dc.titleMolecular epidemiology of swine influenza A viruses in the Southeastern United States, highlights regional differences in circulating strainsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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