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dc.contributor.authorKadir, Mohammad Abdul
dc.contributor.authorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:43:16Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:43:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0957-4824
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/heapro/day003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/372939
dc.description.abstractThere is mixed evidence with some suggesting walking can be increased up to the recommended level through interventions based on behaviour change models and others showing partial or no effects [Arbour and Ginis (A randomised controlled trial of the effects of implementation intentions on women’s walking behaviour. Psychol Health, 2009;24:49–65); Merom et al. (Can a motivational intervention overcome an unsupportive environment for walking–findings from the Step-by-Step Study. Ann Behav Med 2009;38:137–46); Ornes and Ransdell (A pilot study examining exercise self-efficacy as a mediator for walking behavior in college-age women. Perceptual Motor Skills, 2010;1101098–104)]. Taken together, prior studies suggest that ongoing research attention is warranted. Walking behaviour change intervention studies were searched using key search words ‘walking promotion’ and ‘pedometer’ in the PubMed database. Initially, 87 articles were found and 25 walking behaviour change interventions were reviewed to focus attention on reported theory use. Results of the review suggest that interventions that are theoretically underpinned may be no more effective than their counterparts. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) and Social Cognitive Models were most frequently reported with positive effects noted for TTM use. The review also indicates that using single theory may be better than using multiple theories in a single intervention.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto15
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHealth Promotion International
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth Promotion
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111712
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302
dc.titleReported theory use in walking interventions: a literature review and research agenda
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Oxford University Press. This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Health Promotion International following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Reported theory use in walking interventions: a literature review and research agenda, Health Promotion International, pp. 1-15, 2018 is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/day003.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRundle-Thiele, Sharyn
gro.griffith.authorKadir, Mohammad A.


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