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dc.contributor.authorBrown, V
dc.contributor.authorMoodie, M
dc.contributor.authorHerrera, AM Mantilla
dc.contributor.authorVeerman, JL
dc.contributor.authorCarter, R
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-28T01:30:27Z
dc.date.available2018-06-28T01:30:27Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0091-7435
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.12.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/373660
dc.description.abstractGiven the alarming prevalence of obesity worldwide and the need for interventions to halt the growing epidemic, more evidence on the role and impact of transport interventions for obesity prevention is required. This study conducts a scoping review of the current evidence of association between modes of transport (motor vehicle, walking, cycling and public transport) and obesity-related outcomes. Eleven reviews and thirty-three primary studies exploring associations between transport behaviours and obesity were identified. Cohort simulation Markov modelling was used to estimate the effects of body mass index (BMI) change on health outcomes and health care costs of diseases causally related to obesity in the Melbourne, Australia population. Results suggest that evidence for an obesity effect of transport behaviours is inconclusive (29% of published studies reported expected associations, 33% mixed associations), and any potential BMI effect is likely to be relatively small. Hypothetical scenario analyses suggest that active transport interventions may contribute small but significant obesity-related health benefits across populations (approximately 65 health adjusted life years gained per year). Therefore active transport interventions that are low cost and targeted to those most amenable to modal switch are the most likely to be effective and cost-effective from an obesity prevention perspective. The uncertain but potentially significant opportunity for health benefits warrants the collection of more and better quality evidence to fully understand the potential relationships between transport behaviours and obesity. Such evidence would contribute to the obesity prevention dialogue and inform policy across the transportation, health and environmental sectors.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom49
dc.relation.ispartofpageto66
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPreventive Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume96
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPreventive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111716
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302
dc.titleActive transport and obesity prevention: A transportation sector obesity impact scoping review and assessment for Melbourne, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorVeerman, Lennert L.


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