Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSleeman, Isobel
dc.contributor.authorAspray, Terry
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Shirley
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Gordon
dc.contributor.authorKhoo, Tien K
dc.contributor.authorSchoenmakers, Inez
dc.contributor.authorRochester, Lynn
dc.contributor.authorBurn, David
dc.contributor.authorYarnall, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-02T05:18:53Z
dc.date.available2018-05-02T05:18:53Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1877-7171
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/JPD-171122
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/374345
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown that Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have lower serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations than controls. Vitamin D deficiency was associated with increased disease severity and cognitive impairment in prevalent PD patients. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine 25(OH)D in newly diagnosed PD and age-matched controls and to assess if there was an association with clinical outcomes (disease severity, cognition and falls) over the 36-month follow up period. Methods: A prospective observational study of newly diagnosed PD patients in the North East of England with age-matched controls (PD, n = 145; control, n = 94). Serum 25(OH)D was assessed at baseline and 18 months. Participants underwent clinical assessment at baseline, 18 and 36 months. One hundred and ten participants with PD also took part in a prospective falls study. Results: Mean serum 25(OH)D concentrations were lower in PD than control participants at baseline (44.1±21.7 vs. 52.2±22.1 nmol/L, p < 0.05) and 18 months (44.2±23.6 vs. 55.7±28.8 nmol/L, p < 0.05). Baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration, age, motor score and dosage of dopaminergic medication were significant predictors of variance of motor severity at 36 months ((ΔR2 = 0.039, F = 6.6, p < 0.01). Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with cognition or falls during the follow up period. Conclusions: Patients with incident PD had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations than age-matched controls, which may have implications in terms of bone health and fracture risk. There was a small but significant association between vitamin D status at baseline and disease motor severity at 36 months.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherIOS Press
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom669
dc.relation.ispartofpageto675
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Parkinson's Disease
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiochemistry and Cell Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110904
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0601
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.titleThe Role of Vitamin D in Disease Progression in Early Parkinson's Disease
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© IOS Press and the authors. This article is published online with Open Access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 4.0) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKhoo, Tien Kheng


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record