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dc.contributor.authorMurray, Georginaen_US
dc.contributor.editorMike Lloyden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:41:14Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:41:14Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.modified2007-09-02T23:39:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0112921Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/3744
dc.description.abstractInterlocks - so what do they add to an understanding of the power of the boardroom? Here it is argued that the sociological study of interlocks (that is, the links created by a director who is on the board of more than one company or organization) will reveal some but not all dimensions of corporate power. The study of directional interlocks (using only board members from primary organizational positions) will reveal the following traceries of power: first, a map showing inter-firm power links; second, the direction of the flow of corporate information. Third, the links will identify which sector (e.g. productive, financial or service) is at the political center of business relations. A case study of New Zealand big business is chosen here to illustrate the centrality of interlocks. It is shown that industrial companies dominate the interlocking network with the most heavily interlocked director being (verified through other sources) class leaders. However, a triangulation of the interlock data with ownership data from annual company reports, shows that ownership of the means of production is still the key to power relations in this context. The ownership of top companies in New Zealand is, primarily, in the hands of a consortium of overseas finance capital.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent203040 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of social and cultural studies, Victoria University of Wellingtonen_US
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://saanz.science.org.nz/Journal/Vol16(1).html#murrayen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom176en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto201en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNew Zealand Sociologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370602en_US
dc.titleInterlocks or Ownership: New Zealand Boardroom Poweren_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2001 New Zealand Sociology. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2001
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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