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dc.contributor.authorToloo, Ghasem-Sam
dc.contributor.authorBurke, John
dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Julia
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ged
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Bridie
dc.contributor.authorFitzGerald, Gerry
dc.contributor.authorBell, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T12:30:22Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T12:30:22Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0749-6753
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hpm.2475
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/375979
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of this study was to describe emergency department (ED) activities and staffing after the introduction of activity-based funding (ABF) to highlight the challenges of new funding arrangements and their implementation. Methods: A retrospective study of public hospital EDs in Queensland, Australia, was undertaken for 2013-2014. The ED and hospital characteristics are described to evaluate the alignment between activity and resourcing levels and their impact on performance. Results: Twenty EDs participated (74% response rate). Weighted activity units (WAUs) and nursing staff varied based on hospital type and size. Larger hospital EDs had on average 9076 WAUs and 13 full time equivalent (FTE) nursing staff per 1000 WAUs; smaller EDs had on average 4587 WAUs and 10.3 FTE nursing staff per 1000 WAUs. Medical staff was relatively consistent (8.1-8.7 FTE per 1000 WAUs). The proportion of patients admitted, discharged, or transferred within 4 hours ranged from 73% to 79%. The ED medical and nursing staffing numbers did not correlate with the 4-hour performance. Conclusion: Substantial variation exists across Queensland EDs when resourcing service delivery in an activity-based funding environment. Historical inequity persists in the staffing profiles for regional and outer metropolitan departments. The lack of association between resourcing and performance metrics provides opportunity for further investigation of efficient models of care.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley Online
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Health Planning and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.titleUnderstanding ED performance after the implementation of activity-based funding
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Understanding ED performance after the implementation of activity-based funding, International Journal of Health Planning and Management, Pages 1-9, 2017, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/hpm.2475. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCrilly, Julia
gro.griffith.authorWilliams, Ged F.


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