Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBadets, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrison0987657, ClareDNUen_US
dc.contributor.authorVernau, O.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:03:43Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:03:43Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-23T05:46:58Z
dc.identifier.issn1010061Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02078.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37643
dc.description.abstractAmong parasitic platyhelminths with complex life cycles, it has been well documented that transmission opportunities are the main forces shaping the diversity of life-history traits and parasite developmental strategies. While deviations in the development pathway usually involve shortening of life cycles, their extension may also occur following perception of remaining time by parasites. Polystoma gallieni, the monogenean parasite of Hyla meridionalis, is able to trigger two alternative developmental strategies depending on the physiological stage of the tadpoles upon which larvae attach. The distribution and reproductive outputs of both resulting phenotypes were surveyed to address questions about the dynamics of transmission in natural environments. Because modifications in the completion of life cycles can have drawbacks which may perturb the dynamic equilibrium of the resulting host-parasite systems, experimental infestations were also performed to assess parasite-parasite interactions. Our results suggest that the bladder adult phenotype, which involves transmission between frogs and tadpoles, is supplied secondarily by the branchial phenotype which involves transmission between tadpoles and metamorphs. They also support the occurrence of finely tuned trade-offs between hosts and parasites and highlight positive trends behind the extension of direct life cycles, in which host-derived signals account for the remaining time to achieve parasitic transmission.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2151en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2162en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHost-Parasite Interactionsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060307en_US
dc.titleAlternative parasite development in transmission strategies: How time flies!en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record