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dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Amanda J
dc.contributor.authorScahill, Shane
dc.contributor.authorHopcroft, David
dc.contributor.authorStapleton, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-04T12:31:01Z
dc.date.available2019-07-04T12:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0312-8008
dc.identifier.doi10.18773/austprescr.2018.021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/376660
dc.description.abstractMedication errors are a common and significant problem, particularly when patients transition between healthcare providers. Discrepancies are especially prevalent on hospital admission and discharge. People with complex medication regimens, older people, those with mental health problems, people who are poor or have low literacy, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and migrant populations are particularly at risk of medication discrepancies. A patient-centred approach is a necessary shift towards reducing medication discrepancies and errors. The patient is the one ‘constant’ as they progress through GP and ancillary primary care services, hospital services, and specialist outpatient and private clinics. Patients and their carers need to be involved as active participants in this process. Maintaining an accurate, comprehensive and up-to-date medicines list that follows the patient, reduces serious medication error. Pivotal to this record is a medicines reconciliation review at error-prone transition points. Multiple health professionals involved in a patient’s journey through healthcare services need to embrace accountability for medicines-related outcomes. Emerging technologies for communication between primary care and specialist or secondary services will facilitate this, but importantly, there needs to be commitment from each health professional to undertake this approach.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNational Prescribing Service
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom73
dc.relation.ispartofpageto77
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Prescriber
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1115
dc.titleReducing medication errors at transitions of care is everyone's business
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Human Services and Social Work
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 National Prescribing Service. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWheeler, Amanda
gro.griffith.authorStapleton, Helen


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