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dc.contributor.authorSilk, Aaronen_US
dc.contributor.authorSavage, Robbieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarsen, Briannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAisbett, Braden_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:33:54Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:33:54Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-6870en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apergo.2017.11.012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/376784
dc.description.abstractMany police organisations incorporate specialist policing roles where incumbents are tasked with providing operational response capabilities above and beyond the general duties policing role. The current research utilised subjective job task analysis methods to identify and characterise the physically demanding, frequently occurring, and operationally important tasks, as well as the dominant fitness component for each task, inherent to specialist policing roles in an Australian policing organisation. This was achieved through engagement with subject matter experts and online survey responses from specialist police incumbents. In total, 11 criterion tasks were identified, which covered a range of physical capacities including muscular strength, muscular endurance, and aerobic power. The most physically demanding tasks included those with an arrest component, requiring high muscular strength and power capacities. Having identified the criterion tasks, three operational scenarios were constructed, which incorporated each of the 11 tasks in different operational contexts. The criterion tasks and composite scenarios will allow practitioners within specialised police units to develop evidence-based strategies, including physical selection procedures and physical training programs, specific to the demands of their work.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom197en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto203en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalApplied Ergonomicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume68en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDesign Practice and Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110699en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1203en_US
dc.titleIdentifying and characterising the physical demands for an Australian specialist policing uniten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLarsen, Brianna


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