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dc.contributor.convenorRajiv Sabherwal and Mary Sumneren_AU
dc.contributor.authorRowlands, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.editorRajiv Sabherwal, Mary Sumneren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:26:41Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:26:41Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-24T06:48:35Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://icis2010.aisnet.org/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37736
dc.description.abstractThis paper suggest a different approach to doing skill formation research in the IT industry - one that takes into account the interaction over time of intentions, context, process, and action around formal, accredited on-the-job training schemes. To demonstrate, the paper presents the findings of an empirical study into eight small and medium sized enterprise (SME's) experiences when deciding to participate with an on-the-job training scheme for the first time. The literature on vocational training, and specifically participation with work-place based training schemes, is reviewed. The review indicates a need for process research to complement existing research in the field. Eight case studies were designed around semi-structured in-depth interviews, and were conducted to investigate how and why owner/managers decide to participate with on-the-job training for the first time. The study focused on contextual and process elements as well as the action of key players associated with participation. Grounded theory analysis of the case data produced a structure of conceptual categories and themes related to the participation process within the context of small business in the information technology industry. The theory generated from the empirical findings suggests that the intentions and actions of owner/managers, the processes they enact, as well as the social context into which they are implemented, critically influence what decisions are associated with on-the-job IT skilling. The findings provide insights for policy and practice, detailing the organisational decision-making that are associated with skilling under certain circumstances, and how these might be assessed and managed. Implications for vocational training in small business based on the findings are advanced.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAssociation for Information Systemsen_US
dc.publisher.placeAtlanta, GAen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://icis2010.aisnet.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameInternational Conference on Information Systemsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleInternational Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) 2010 Proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-12-10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-12-15en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSt Louis, USAen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInformation Systems Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode080609en_US
dc.titleChallenging the Economic Bias among Skill Formation Research in the IT Industryen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Information and Communication Technologyen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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