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dc.contributor.authorBielefeld, Shelley
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-17T01:30:17Z
dc.date.available2018-07-17T01:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1328-5475
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/377573
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Delivering social security payments by means of cashless welfare cards has had a protracted trial in Australia, with various income management schemes in operation, the latest of which is the Forrest Review inspired Cashless Debit Card (CDC) issued by Indue Ltd. These schemes have been controversial since the first compulsory income management program emerged as part of the Northern Territory Intervention, yet the trend of cashless welfare delivery is expanding, considerably increasing the overall cost of social security payments. A key government rationale for various forms of cashless welfare is that something must be done to address the risk that welfare recipients might use their income to support substance abuse and gambling. Numerous welfare recipients subject to income management report that it has created additional difficulties for them in meeting their needs. Despite this, advocates of cashless welfare are keen to declare income management a success, rationalising further expansion and possibly smoothing the path to increased privatisation of social security payments in the process. Unlike earlier income management schemes operating with a government issued BasicsCard, the CDC involves a commercial financial services provider making a hefty profit from delivering this costly program.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales
dc.publisher.urihttps://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=040910762918470;res=IELIND
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom28
dc.relation.ispartofpageto32
dc.relation.ispartofissue29
dc.relation.ispartofjournalIndigenous Law Bulletin
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180119
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160501
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleCashless welfare cards: controlling spending patterns to what end?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Indigenous Law Centre and the author(s). The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author(s).
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBielefeld, Shelley S.


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