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dc.contributor.authorReser, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorBentrupperbaumer, J.en_US
dc.contributor.editorVicky Mrowinski, Michael Kyrios and Nicholas Voudourisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:25:38Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:25:38Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-14T06:19:44Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37759
dc.description.abstractThe presentation addresses the role of psychology in the research, planning, and management of World Heritage Areas in the rainforests of Far North Queensland. Psychology and protected area management requires not only a bringing together of relevant theory, research and applied areas of psychology and social science (e.g., environmental perception, place attachment, restoration, leisure studies, natural and cultural heritage interpretation, behavioural design, crowding, risk management, and environmental impact assessment) but collaborating and communicating with natural scientists, resource managers, government bodies, the tourism industry, conservation groups, the catchment community, and national and international visitors. Environmental psychology has the reach and breadth and body of knowledge and research findings to make a substantial contribution in such protected area and natural and cultural heritage management contexts, but requires a thoughtful and transdisciplinary approach, and a strategic and informed framing of both the research and the discourse when working in this multi-disciplinary but rarely interdisciplinary space. The presenters provide a number of windows on managing and communicating their research and 'management' roles and status as environmental psychologists in the Wet Tropics along with addressing the people side of World Heritage Area management. Noteworthy challenges included an appropriate and ecological framing of a transactional approach, bringing the human landscape into the frame, designing a methodology which captures all visitors and 'users' of such landscapes and places, working through serious language and meaning fault lines, reframing restoration and ecosystem system services conceptualisations, designing for experiences and encounters, developing a psychosocial impact assessment framework and indicators, managing virtual environments and representations, and addressing 'the role of the World Heritage Area in the life of the community'.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAPSen_US
dc.publisher.placeMelbourneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://icap2010.eproceedings.com.au/index.phpen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename27th International Congress of Applied Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAbstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-07-11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-07-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMelbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Healthen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714en_US
dc.titleFraming and researching the psychological in World Heritage Areasen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorReser, Joseph P.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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