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dc.contributor.advisorVlacic, Ljubo
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Gerrad
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-28T02:02:18Z
dc.date.available2018-06-28T02:02:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/1075
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/377652
dc.description.abstractThe performance of a processing plant can be measured in many ways, whether it be production throughput, product quality within contract specifications or cost per tonne margins which may extend to process energy consumption (electrical or steam), equipment maintenance or failure or resourcing costs. A processing plant can be a complex process with multiple control schemes ranging from simple control to advanced control such as supervisory schemes, incorporating estimation and optimization techniques. Each processing plant operates to specific process objectives often represented by a target operating point. Often, after some years of plant operation the operating point has drifted from the target. Before the processing plant is returned to the target operating point and its performance re-tuned, the performance of the control schemes must be understood and areas for improvement identified. This research proposes a methodology named OCTOGRAPH, that assesses the control scheme performance of the industrial plant, identifying control loops for improvement and control strategies to be implemented. The aim of the methodology is to improve the performance of the industrial plant, returning the operating point to the desired target. This thesis has developed an extension to the Harris Index capable of providing control practitioners with both, the paradigm and a practical tool to assess the current state of the control schemes within the industrial setting with no impact on production and no requirement for a priori knowledge of the control scheme or process dynamics. The developed performance assessment paradigm also provides guidance to improvement areas with a plant-wide process improvement focus. The results conclude that a mineral processing plant operating point does drift from the nominated operating set point. By firstly assessing the mineral processing plant with a closed loop control performance assessment technique with a focus on the plant-wide interactions, the plants control performance is calculated. The challenge then is to determine how to improve the performance of the plant to return the plant to the nominal operating point. The OCTOGRAPH methodology presented describes the interconnections between each of the process and manipulated variables in the form of a dead time relationship. By connecting the process variables in the shortest path, constructing a control strategy improves the plant performance.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsOctograph
dc.subject.keywordsIndustrial plant
dc.subject.keywordsProcessing plant
dc.subject.keywordsHarris Index
dc.subject.keywordsPlant performance
dc.titleOCTOGRAPH: A Methodology for Returning the Industrial Plant to the Desired Operating Point
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyScience, Environment, Engineering and Technology
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorLi, Qin
dc.contributor.otheradvisorMills, Peter
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
gro.departmentSchool of Eng & Built Env
gro.griffith.authorDuffy, Gerrad


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