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dc.contributor.authorMehr, S
dc.contributor.authorFrith, K
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, EH
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, DE
dc.contributor.authorAllen, K
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, E
dc.contributor.authorGold, M
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, P
dc.contributor.authorKakakios, A
dc.contributor.authorLoh, R
dc.contributor.authorMehr, S
dc.contributor.authorPeake, J
dc.contributor.authorSmart, J
dc.contributor.authorSmith, P
dc.contributor.authorTang, M
dc.contributor.authorWainstein, B
dc.contributor.authorWong, M
dc.contributor.authorZurynski, Y
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-26T12:30:44Z
dc.date.available2018-09-26T12:30:44Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0091-6749
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaci.2017.03.027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/377960
dc.description.abstractBackground: Food protein–induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non–IgE-mediated gastrointestinal allergic disorder. Large population-based FPIES studies are lacking. Objective: We sought to determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of FPIES in Australian infants. Methods: An Australia-wide survey (2012-2014) was undertaken through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, with monthly notification of new cases of acute FPIES in infants aged less than 24 months by 1400 participating pediatricians. Results: Two hundred thirty infants with FPIES were identified. The incidence of FPIES in Australian infants (<24 months) was 15.4/100,000/y. Median age of first episode, diagnosis, and notification were 5, 7, and 10 months, respectively. There was no sex predilection. Seven percent of infants had siblings with a history of FPIES, and 5% reacted during exclusive breast-feeding. Sixty-eight had a single food trigger (20% had 2 and 12% had ≥3 food triggers). The most common FPIES triggers were rice (45%), cow's milk (33%), and egg (12%). Fifty-one percent of infants reacted on their first known exposure. Infants with FPIES to multiple versus single food groups were younger at the initial episode (4.6 vs 5.8 months [mean], P = .001) and more frequently had FPIES to fruits, vegetables, or both (66% vs 21%, P < .0001). Infants exclusively breast-fed for more than 4 months had a trend toward lower rates of FPIES to multiple food groups (23% vs 36%, P = .06). Sixty-four percent of infants with FPIES to multiple foods, which included cow's milk, had coassociated FPIES to solid foods. Forty-two percent of infants with FPIES to fish reacted to other food groups. Conclusions: FPIES is not rare, with an estimated incidence of 15.4/100,000/y. Rice is the most common food trigger in Australia. Factors associated with FPIES to multiple foods included early-onset disease and FPIES to fruits, vegetables, or both.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherMosby, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1323
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1330
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume140
dc.subject.fieldofresearchImmunology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchImmunology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1107
dc.titleFood protein–induced enterocolitis syndrome in Australia: A population-based study, 2012-2014
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSmith, Peter K.


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