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dc.contributor.authorPeters, TD
dc.contributor.editorTimothy Peters, Karen Crawley
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-12T12:32:00Z
dc.date.available2019-06-12T12:32:00Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9781138123762
dc.identifier.doi10.4324/9781315648637
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/377966
dc.description.abstractThis chapter seeks to examine the underlying vision of law, legality and justice being propounded by the superhero on screen and beyond today. It explores the way in which Nolan’s The Dark Knight Trilogy both draws on and transforms the genre’s traditional tropes—including its critique of the law. Nolan’s films point to an understanding of legality that responds to the prevalence of legal and biopolitical exceptionalism, both on screen in terms of the dominance of the superhero genre, and in the practice and operation of law—revealing the intertwined nature of representation and reality in our envisioning of legality.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleEnvisioning Legality: Law, Culture and Representation
dc.relation.ispartofchapter4
dc.relation.ispartofchapternumbers11
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom68
dc.relation.ispartofpageto95
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Legal Studies not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode189999
dc.title'Seeing' justice done: envisioning legality in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight Trilogy
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dc.type.codeB - Book Chapters
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Griffith Law School
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorPeters, Timothy D.


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