Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTeodorczuk, A
dc.contributor.authorBillett, S
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T02:55:41Z
dc.date.available2018-07-04T02:55:41Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1442-1100
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/378085
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: This theoretical paper is a scenario-based account of interprofessional healthcare work that highlights tensions between desired and actual practice behaviour in clinical settings. Case Study: In this account, against his best clinical judgment and because of situational ward pressures, a junior doctor prescribes antipsychotic medication for a high-risk confused, frail, elderly patient. A healthcare assistant, who possesses key patient-specific information, holds back on sharing this information because of similar pressures. Analysis: Sociocultural analysis of this account identifies three epistemological factors constraining an individuals’ discretion and behaviour. First, situated team collective practice overrides individual knowledge. Secondly, collective practice, though held strongly by core members of clinical teams, may in fact be erroneous, and fail to support new learning about and through practice, to the detriment of patient care. Thirdly, situated practices of the ward community may marginalise some team members and inhibit their contributions to patient safety. Conclusions: To redress such constraints, we propose the development of, and engagement with, artefacts or tools that shape inclusive practice and assist improvements in practice. Such an approach can lead to productive learning through practice in interprofessional healthcare teams. To elaborate the case, the illustrative example of the Delirium Early Monitoring System (DEMS) is used. This artefact can be effective in socioculturally mediating unhelpful situational pressures that impact on clinical teams’ management of delirium, by including and legitimising a range of professional voices. This mediation can also include voices that are external to the immediate clinical situation, which can inform interprofessional care, promote interdependence and foster patient-centred working communities of healthcare practice.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherANZAHPE
dc.publisher.urihttps://fohpe.org/FoHPE/article/view/158
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom80
dc.relation.ispartofpageto91
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFocus on Health Professional Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Medical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.titleMediating workplace situational pressures: The role of artefacts in promoting effective interprofessional work and learning
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicine
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 ANZAHPE. Published version of the paper reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from ANZAHPE.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBillett, Stephen R.
gro.griffith.authorTeodorczuk, Andrew


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record