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dc.contributor.authorGilby, Ben
dc.contributor.authorBurfeind, Dana
dc.contributor.authorTibbetts, Ian R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:52:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:52:09Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.modified2011-03-29T06:53:34Z
dc.identifier.issn00253162
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00227-010-1555-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37813
dc.description.abstractIncreasing concerns about the ecological impacts of ongoing and possibly worsening blooms of the toxic, carcinogenic cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula in Moreton Bay, Australia, led us to assess differences in meiofaunal prey assemblages between bloom and nonbloom substrates and the potential dietary impacts of dense L. majuscula blooms on the omnivorous benthivore, the Eastern Long-finned Goby, Favonigobius lentiginosus and the obligate meiobenthivorous juveniles of Trumpeter Whiting, Sillago maculata. Marked differences in invertebrate communities were found between sandy and L. majuscula bloom foraging substrates, with copepods significantly more abundant (18.49% vs. 70.44% numerical abundance) and nematodes significantly less abundant (55.91% vs. 1.21% numerical abundance) within bloom material. Gut analyses showed that bentho-planktivorous fishes exposed to L. majuscula in captivity had consumed a significantly greater quantity of prey by both total number (P/0.0019) and volume (P/0.0006) than fish exposed to sand treatments. Thus, it is likely for such fishes that L. majuscula blooms increase rates of prey encounter and consumption, with consequent changes in trophic relationships through shifts in predator-prey interactions between small benthivorous fishes and their meiofaunal prey.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom245
dc.relation.ispartofpageto255
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMarine Biology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume158
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleLyngbya majuscula blooms and the diet of small subtropical benthivorous fishes
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBurfeind, Dana D.
gro.griffith.authorGilby, Ben


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