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dc.contributor.authorMorrison0987657, ClareDNUen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeppel, Gunnaren_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Nuniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRounds, Isaacen_US
dc.contributor.authorS. Harlow, Peteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:18:11Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:18:11Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2012-02-10T02:08:05Z
dc.identifier.issn00308870en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2984/049.063.0205en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/37883
dc.description.abstractTropical dry forests are a unique and threatened ecosystem in the Pacific and globally. In Fiji, the endangered Fijian crested iguana (Bracbylopbus vitiensis) is endemic to tropical dry forests. Yadua Taba Island contains one of the best remaining stands of tropical dry forest in the Pacific along with the largest (and only secure) population of B. vitiensis in Fiji and has been proposed as a translocation source for iguana conservation. In this study we determined the major vegetation types on Yadua Taba and identified forest habitat preferences of B. vitiensis to (1) characterize the island's habitats for tropical dry forest regeneration monitoring and (2) understand which forest types are preferred by iguanas for future translocation projects. Vegetation data were collected using reconnaissance, entitation, line transects, and aerial photos. Iguana abundance data were collected by nocturnal surveys of permanent transects. Six major vegetation types were identified of which tropical dry forest was the largest (46% of the island), followed by a combination of rocky cliff-shrubland/grassland vegetation (26%). Our conservative estimate of B. vitiensis population size on Yadua Taba is 12,000 iguanas, the majority of which occur in tropical dry forest. Superabundance of the dry forest understory tree Vavaea amicorum, the favorite fruit species of iguanas, may help account for the high density of iguanas observed. These results highlight the ecological link between tropical dry forest and B. vitiensis and emphasize the importance of rehabilitation or conservation of tropical dry forest habitat in potential iguana translocation sites as part of the management plan for B. vitiensis throughout the Fiji Islands.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent638967 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Hawaii Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom223en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto242en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPacific Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume63en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchConservation and Biodiversityen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050202en_US
dc.titleCritically Endangered Fijian Crested Iguana (Brachylophus vitiensis) Shows Habitat Preference for Globally Threatened Tropical Dry Foresten_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 University of Hawai'i Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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