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dc.contributor.authorGabric, Alberten_US
dc.contributor.authorMatrai, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Grahamen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Juliaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-08T01:40:58Z
dc.date.available2019-06-08T01:40:58Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-0007en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/BAMS-D-16-0254.1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/379902
dc.description.abstractAccurate estimation of the climate sensitivity requires a better understanding of the nexus between polar marine ecosystem responses to warming, changes in sea ice extent, and emissions of marine biogenic aerosol (MBA). Sea ice brine channels contain very high concentrations of MBA precursors that, once ventilated, have the potential to alter cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet number, and the regional radiative energy balance. In contrast to temperate latitudes, where the pelagic phytoplankton are major sources of MBAs, the seasonal sea ice dynamic plays a key role in determining MBA concentration in both the Arctic and Antarctic. We review the current knowledge of MBA sources and the link between ice melt and emissions of aerosol precursors in the polar oceans. We illustrate the processes by examining decadal-scale time series in various satellite-derived parameters such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), sea ice extent, and phytoplankton biomass in the sea ice zones of both hemispheres. The sharpest gradients in aerosol indicators occur during the spring period of ice melt. In sea ice–covered waters, the peak in AOD occurs well before the annual maximum in biomass in both hemispheres. The results provide strong evidence that suggests seasonal changes in sea ice and ocean biology are key drivers of the polar aerosol cycle. The positive trend in annual-mean Antarctic sea ice extent is now almost one-third of the magnitude of the annual-mean decrease in Arctic sea ice, suggesting the potential for different patterns of aerosol emissions in the future.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom61en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto82en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume99en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Geography and Environmental Geoscience not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAstronomical and Space Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode040699en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0201en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0401en_US
dc.titleThe Nexus between Sea Ice and Polar Emissions of Marine Biogenic Aerosolsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Environment and Scienceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.en_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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