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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Kyra
dc.contributor.authorCornish, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorKirkpatrick, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorKroon, Jeroen
dc.contributor.authorSchwarzer, Ralf
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:04:28Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:04:28Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1359-107X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjhp.12294
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/379905
dc.description.abstractObjectives: With 60–90% of children worldwide reportedly experiencing dental caries, poor oral health in the younger years is a major public health issue. As parents are important to children's oral hygiene practices, we examined the key self‐regulatory behaviours of parents for supervising their children's toothbrushing using the health action process approach. Design and method: Participants (N = 281, 197 mothers) comprised Australian parents of 2‐ to 5‐year‐olds. A longitudinal design was used to investigate the sequential mediation chain for the effect of intention (Time 1) on parental supervision for their youngest child's toothbrushing (Time 3), via self‐efficacy and planning (Time 2), and action control (Time 3). Results: A latent‐variable structural equation model, controlling for baseline behaviour and habit, revealed significant indirect effects from intention via self‐efficacy and action control and intention via planning and action control, on parental supervision behaviour. The model was a good fit to the data, explaining 74% of the variance in parents’ supervising behaviour for their children's toothbrushing. Conclusion: While national recommendations are provided to guide parents in promoting good oral hygiene practices with their children, current results show the importance of going beyond simple knowledge transmission to support parents’ intentions to supervise their children's toothbrushing actually materialize. Current findings make a significant contribution to the cumulative empirical evidence regarding self‐regulatory components in health behaviour change and can inform intervention development to increase parents’ participation in childhood oral hygiene practices, thus helping to curb rising oral health conditions and diseases.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom387
dc.relation.ispartofpageto406
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther psychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4410
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode529999
dc.titleParental supervision for their children's toothbrushing: Mediating effects of planning, self-efficacy, and action control
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHamilton, Kyra
gro.griffith.authorKroon, Jeroen
gro.griffith.authorKirkpatrick, Aaron
gro.griffith.authorCornish, Stephen W.


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