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dc.contributor.authorOgbo, Felix
dc.contributor.authorEastwood, John
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorJalaludin, Bin
dc.contributor.authorAgho, Kingsley
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Bryanne
dc.contributor.authorPage, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:04:22Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:04:22Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1471-244X
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12888-018-1598-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/379924
dc.description.abstractBackground: Depression is a leading source of morbidity and health loss in Australian women. This study investigates the determinants of antenatal depressive symptoms and postnatal depressive symptoms in an Australian population, including people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. Method: The study used a retrospective cohort of mothers of all live births in public health facilities in 2014 (N = 17,564) within South Western Sydney Local Health District and Sydney Local Health District in New South Wales, Australia. Prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms were estimated for the cohort. Multivariate logistic regression models were conducted to investigate the sociodemographic, psychological and health service determinants of antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms, measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Results: The prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms was 6.2% and 3.3% of the cohort, respectively. Significant risk factors for maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy were, a lack of partner support, history of intimate partner violence, being from the CALD population and low socioeconomic status. Self-reported antenatal depressive symptoms were strongly associated with postnatal depressive symptoms. Risk factors for postnatal depressive symptoms were similar to those for antenatal depressive symptoms, as well as assisted delivery. Conclusion: Factors relating to demographic and psychosocial disadvantage were associated with subsequent antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms in New South Wales, Australia. Our study suggests that screening for probable depression and timely referral for expert assessment of at-risk mothers may be an effective strategy to improve maternal mental health outcomes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofchapter49
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto11
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Psychiatry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.titleDeterminants of antenatal depression and postnatal depression in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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gro.griffith.authorEastwood, John


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