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dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Louisa J
dc.contributor.authorThom, Ogilvie
dc.contributor.authorGreenslade, Jaimi H
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Amy NB
dc.contributor.authorCarlstrom, Eric
dc.contributor.authorMills, Donna
dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-19T13:08:01Z
dc.date.available2019-06-19T13:08:01Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1742-6723.12895
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380008
dc.description.abstractObjective: Clinical staff in EDs are subject to a range of stressors. The objective of this study was to describe and compare clinical staff perceptions of their ED’s working environment across two different Australian EDs. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, research design that included distribution of three survey tools to clinical staff in two Australian EDs in 2016. Descriptive statistics were reported to characterise workplace stressors, coping styles and the ED environment. These data were compared by hospital and the employee’s clinical role (nurse or physician). Results: In total, 146 ED nurses and doctors completed the survey (response rate: 67%). Despite geographical variation, the staff at the two locations had similar demographic profiles in terms of age, sex and years of experience. Staff reported moderate levels of workload and self-realisation but low levels of conflict or nervousness in the workplace. Nurses and physicians reported similar perceptions of the work environment, although nurses reported slightly higher median levels of workload. Staff rated the death or sexual abuse of a child as most stressful, followed by workplace violence and heavy workload. Staff used a large range of coping strategies, and these were similar across both sites. Conclusion: These findings are the first multi-site and multidisciplinary examinations of Australian ED staff perceptions, improving our understanding of staff stressors and coping strategies and highlighting similarities across different EDs. These data support the development and implementation of strategies to improve ED working environments to help ensure professional longevity of ED staff.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom375
dc.relation.ispartofpageto381
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume30
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleMorale, stress and coping strategies of staff working in the emergency department: A comparison of two different-sized departments
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWallis, Marianne
gro.griffith.authorCrilly, Julia
gro.griffith.authorJohnston, Amy N.
gro.griffith.authorMills, Donna M.


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