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dc.contributor.authorArklay, Traceyen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Acker, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHollander, Robynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:44:16Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:44:16Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn2574-1292en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/25741292.2018.1455634en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380041
dc.description.abstractThe necessity for reducing the run-off of nitrogen from the sugar industry into Queensland’s Great Barrier Reef has been recognized by governments and scientists for decades. Governments have unsuccessfully attempted to address this problem through legislation, regulation, and educating stakeholders. Officials have also understood that farmers’ resistance was a problem because reform involved asking them to change the farming methods of a lifetime. This paper examines an innovative program, the Burdekin nitrogen trial (RP20) that significantly changed industry practices in an important sugar cane growing region in Australia. One of the key challenges to achieving success was the public servants – the policy entrepreneurs – and their ability to convert a farmer – an open minded skeptic – into a policy champion. Through the adoption of a risky and previously untried collaboration strategy between public servants and this open-minded skeptic, an entrenched and formally opposing group of stakeholders began working with government to implement RP20, an innovative plan to overcome farmer resistance and reduce nitrogen runoff. As RP20 unfolded we gain insight into how the bureaucrats shed old ways of doing business, and became effective agents of policy change. These public servants grasped the window of opportunity that opened unexpectedly, reframed the policy problem and replaced the cane farmers’ skepticism and resistance with high levels of trust and rapport.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom103en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto114en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPolicy Design and Practiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume1en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160599en_US
dc.titlePolicy entrepreneurs searching for the open-minded skeptic: a new approach to engagement in difficult policy areasen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorArklay, Tracey M.
gro.griffith.authorvan Acker, Elizabeth H.
gro.griffith.authorHollander, Robyn A.


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