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dc.contributor.authorDevilly, Grant
dc.contributor.authorVarker, Tracey
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-29T22:34:06Z
dc.date.available2018-08-29T22:34:06Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380196
dc.description.abstractThis study represents the first randomised controlled study of a resilience training program, based on empirical evidence and designed to inoculate emergency services personnel against job stressors. It has highlighted the fact that the vast majority of police recruits were resilient to exposure to traumatic events. Findings at six-month follow-up indicate that more than half of all participants reported a total substance or alcohol involvement score that was at risk level. This suggests the need for clear, comprehensive and widely known policies and procedures to be put in place to identify and support those with either substance or alcohol use problems Overall, the results of this study provide support for the inclusion of resilience training in the overall training of new-recruit police officers until further, long-term follow-ups suggest otherwise.en_US
dc.publisherCommonwealth of Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.ndlerf.gov.au/publications/monographs/monograph-47en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199en_US
dc.titleThe prevention of trauma reactions in police officers: Decreasing reliance on drugs and alcoholen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.type.descriptionU1_1 - Public sectoren_US
dc.type.codeU - Research Reports for an External Bodyen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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