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dc.contributor.authorScott, Abigailen_US
dc.contributor.authorYork, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Clareen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacreadie, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Rodericken_US
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Meganen_US
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Jessieen_US
dc.contributor.authorJinks, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Heleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorRasheed, Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T13:06:13Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T13:06:13Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-462Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpls.2018.00127en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380283
dc.description.abstractSeagrass meadows support key ecosystem services, via provision of food directly for herbivores, and indirectly to their predators. The importance of herbivores in seagrass meadows has been well-documented, but the links between food webs and ecosystem services in seagrass meadows have not previously been made explicit. Herbivores interact with ecosystem services – including carbon sequestration, cultural values, and coastal protection. Interactions can be positive or negative and depend on a range of factors including the herbivore identity and the grazing type and intensity. There can be unintended consequences from management actions based on a poor understanding of trade-offs that occur with complex seagrass-herbivore interactions. Tropical seagrass meadows support a diversity of grazers spanning the meso-, macro-, and megaherbivore scales. We present a conceptual model to describe how multiple ecosystem services are influenced by herbivore pressure in tropical seagrass meadows. Our model suggests that a balanced ecosystem, incorporating both seagrass and herbivore diversity, is likely to sustain the broadest range of ecosystem services. Our framework suggests the pathway to achieve desired ecosystem services outcomes requires knowledge on four key areas: (1) how size classes of herbivores interact to structure seagrass; (2) desired community and management values; (3) seagrass responses to top–down and bottom–up controls; (4) the pathway from intermediate to final ecosystem services and human benefits. We suggest research should be directed to these areas. Herbivory is a major structuring influence in tropical seagrass systems and needs to be considered for effective management of these critical habitats and their services.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter127en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Plant Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPlant Biology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060799en_US
dc.titleThe Role of Herbivory in Structuring Tropical Seagrass Ecosystem Service Deliveryen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Scott, York, Duncan, Macreadie, Connolly, Ellis, Jarvis, Jinks, Marsh and Rasheed. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
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