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dc.contributor.authorPedersen, John Storm
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:35:27Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:35:27Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0144-333X
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/IJSSP-05-2017-0062
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380314
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to: first, explain why a new model of the provision of welfare services to citizens arises from the digital society; second explore some core elements of the competition between the new model of the provision of welfare services and the classic ideal model of the professionals’ provision of welfare services; third, suggest why it is most likely that the two models of the provision of services are combined into a symbiotic co-evolution scenario; and fourth, examine why and how this symbiotic co-evolution scenario results in new participatory spaces for the main actors associated with the provision of welfare services. Design/methodology/approach – The review of the literature examines how the new model for the provision of welfare services facilitated by big data challenges the traditional professional model for the provision of welfare services. The authors use the Danish case to illustrate a number of themes related to this looking at the hospital sector as an example. Findings – The proposition is that a symbiotic co-evolution scenario will emerge. A mix of the classic ideal model and practice of the service professionals’ provision of services and the digital society’s model of the provision of services is the most likely scenario in the years to come. Furthermore, Data-driven management (DDM) as an integrated key element in a symbiotic co-evolution creates (opens up) participatory environments and spaces for the main actors and agents associated with the provision of welfare services to the citizens. Research limitations/implications – DDM’s impact on the provision of welfare services is still being realised and worked out, and more empirical research is needed before it is possible to point at the most likely scenario. However, according to the authors’ analytical framework, the institutional logics perspective, as presented in Section 2, a symbiotic co-evolution is most likely such that DDM will constitute a new logic within the provision of welfare services on the basis of which citizens as end-users could be provided with welfare services, but it is not likely that the new logic of DDM can displace the classic service professionals’ model of the provision of welfare services. Therefore, the new logic of DDM will be combined with and integrated into the existing logics within service provision, such as the Weberian bureaucracy, the Street-Level Bureaucracy, the New Public Governance and the Market. In spite of this, DDM can successfully be promoted by international management consulting firms, as a management concept which can remedy all the problems of the classic service professionals’ model of the provision of welfare services to citizens. Practical implications – As a consequence of this, new relationships among professionals, data analytics, (middle) managers and citizens will be created regarding the provision of welfare services. Considering the new participatory environments and spaces and the new relationships among the classic service professionals, the data analytics, the (middle) managers and the citizens as end-users, the provision of welfare services may become an arena for negotiation of a new future model of the provision of welfare services to citizens. Originality/value – The digital society has emerged from and developed further via: digitising, online information in almost real time, algorithms, data-informed decision-making processes, DDM and, ultimately, big data. The authors expect to see further digitising, more sophisticated algorithms and more big data. The authors suggest that a new model of the provision of welfare services to citizens will emerge from the development of the digital society. The authors also suggest that this new model will compete with the classic model of the provision of welfare services.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEmerald Insight
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom194
dc.relation.ispartofpageto209
dc.relation.ispartofissue3/4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
dc.relation.ispartofvolume38
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160899
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1205
dc.titleThe digital society and provision of welfare services
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWilkinson, Adrian J.


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