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dc.contributor.authorLeyland, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRowse, Georginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmerson, Lisa Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:35:07Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:35:07Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1528-3542en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/emo0000425en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380326
dc.description.abstractSelf-regulation is the control of aspects of the self to allow pursuit of long-term goals, and it is proposed as a central pathway through which mindfulness may exert benefits on well-being. However, the effects of a single mindfulness induction on self-regulation are not clear, as there has been no comprehensive review of this evidence. The current review synthesized existing findings relating to the effect of a mindfulness induction delivered in a laboratory setting on measures of self-regulation. Twenty-seven studies were included and grouped according to 3 outcomes: regulation of experimentally induced negative affect (k = 15; meta-analysis), emotion-regulation strategies (k = 7) and executive functions (k = 9; narrative synthesis). A mindfulness induction was superior to comparison groups in enhancing the regulation of negative affect (d = –.28). Executive-function performance was enhanced only when the experimental design included an affect induction or when the outcome was sustained attention. The effect on emotion-regulation strategies was inconclusive, but with emerging evidence for an effect on rumination. Overall, the findings indicate that, in the form of an induction, mindfulness may have the most immediate effect on attention mechanisms rather than exerting cognitive changes in other domains, as are often reported outcomes of longer mindfulness training. Through effecting change in attention, emotion regulation of negative affect can be enhanced, and subsequently, executive-function performance more quickly restored. The interpretations of the findings are caveated with consideration of the low quality of many of the included study designs determined by the quality appraisal tool.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto32en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmotionen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702en_US
dc.titleExperimental effects of mindfulness inductions on self-regulation: Systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 American Psycological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Reproduced here in accordance with publisher policy. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
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