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dc.contributor.authorWaters, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, Yuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKershaw, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorKerbler, Georgen_US
dc.contributor.authorShum, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorZimmer-Gembeck, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorCraske, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Brendanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMogg, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPine, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorCunnington, Rossen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-09T01:30:40Z
dc.date.available2019-06-09T01:30:40Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0887-6185en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.janxdis.2018.02.004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380348
dc.description.abstractPrior research indicates that positive search training (PST) may be a promising home-based computerised treatment for childhood anxiety disorders. It explicitly trains anxious individuals in adaptive, goal-directed attention-search strategies to search for positive and calm information and ignore goal-irrelevant negative cues. Although PST reduces anxiety symptoms, its neural effects are unknown. The main aim of this study was to examine changes in neural activation associated with changes in attention processing of positive and negative stimuli from pre- to post-treatment with PST in children with anxiety disorders. Children’s neural activation was assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a visual-probe task indexing attention allocation to threat-neutral and positive-neutral pairs. Results showed pre- to post-treatment reductions in anxiety symptoms and neural reactivity to emotional faces (angry and happy faces, relative to neutral faces) within a broad neural network linking frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions. Changes in neural reactivity were highly inter-correlated across regions. Neural reactivity to the threat-bias contrast reduced from pre- to post-treatment in the mid/posterior cingulate cortex. Results are considered in relation to prior research linking anxiety disorders and treatment effects with functioning of a broad limbic-cortical network involved in emotion reactivity and regulation, and integrative functions linking emotion, memory, sensory and motor processes and attention control.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom22en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Anxiety Disordersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume55en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.titleChanges in neural activation underlying attention processing of emotional stimuli following treatment with positive search training in anxious childrenen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
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