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dc.contributor.authorO'Loingsigh, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcTainsh, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTapper, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShinkfield, P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:36:45Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:36:45Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-07-12T07:52:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1875-9637en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aeolia.2010.03.002en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/38048
dc.description.abstractWeather stations around the world record surface meteorological observations using the SYNOP coding system defined by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). These codes are used for a variety of meteorological studies, along with remote sensing and modelling studies of wind erosion and dust transport. Despite the widespread use of SYNOP codes in wind erosion research and monitoring in Australia and internationally, few studies, if any, have examined in detail the manner in which the codes are recorded and archived, and how this might affect the quality of the data and the outcomes of the research. In this study we investigate how different methods of recording and archiving SYNOP codes relating to wind erosion and dust transport can under-estimate the frequency and inaccurately record the timing of wind erosion events. We examine 8 years of wind erosion data in the Lake Eyre Basin of central Australia (2000-2008) using more complete data from weather stations and compare them with the official archived dataset. On average, the number of dust days in the Lake Eyre Basin was under-estimated by 7% per year and the number of dust storm days (visibility <1 km) by 15% per year. In addition, what appears to be a clear inverse relationship between rainfall and dust activity may in some cases be an artefact of dust codes having been lost in processing and archiving. We also found that thunderstorms are responsible for more dust storms than previously thought.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent2266339 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom49en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto57en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAeolian Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMeteorologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode040107en_US
dc.titleLost in code: A critical analysis of using meteorological data for wind erosion monitoring.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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