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dc.contributor.authorBaker, Gideon
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-26T05:29:11Z
dc.date.available2018-09-26T05:29:11Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1092-311X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380549
dc.description.abstractThe Ancient Cynic Diogenes of Sinope was the first to call himself a cosmopolitan because the Cynic true life, as a living according to phusis rather than nomos (law), enabled the negation of the polis. The polis, which divides according to citizenship, was shown to be nothing and Diogenes became a citizen of the world (kosmopolitês) by default. I link this to the Cynic sense of phusis as ‘being’, rather than the usual ‘nature’, concluding that this cosmopolitanism by way of phusis was universal in a way that later cosmopolitanisms by way of kosmos (as in Stoicism) could never be.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press
dc.publisher.urihttps://muse.jhu.edu/article/698879
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom607
dc.relation.ispartofpageto626
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTheory and Event
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCultural Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode220399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2002
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2203
dc.titleCynical Cosmopolitanism
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relations
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBaker, Gideon B.


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