Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEmerson, Lisa Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeapy, Connoren_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcia-Soriano, Gemmaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:35:08Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:35:08Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1868-8527en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12671-017-0854-3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380621
dc.description.abstractObsessive intrusive thoughts (OITs) are experienced by the majority of the general population, and in their more extreme forms are characteristic of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). These cognitions are said to exist on a continuum that includes differences in their frequency and associated distress. The key factors that contribute to an increased frequency and distress are how the individual appraises and responds to the OIT. Facets of mindfulness, such as nonjudgment and nonreactivity, offer an alternative approach to OITs than the negative appraisals and commonly utilised control strategies that often contribute to distress. Clarifying the role of facets of mindfulness in relation to these cognitions offers a means to elucidate individual characteristics that may offer protection from distress associated with OITs. A sample of nonclinical individuals (n = 583) completed an online survey that assessed their experiences of OITs, including frequency, emotional reaction and appraisals, and trait mindfulness. The findings from a series of multiple regression analyses confirmed that specific facets of mindfulness relating to acting with awareness and acceptance (nonjudgment and nonreactivity) consistently predicted less frequent and distressing experiences of OITs. In contrast, the observe facet emerged as a consistent predictor of negative experiences of OITs. These findings suggest that acting with awareness and acceptance may confer protective characteristics in relation to OITs, but that the observe facet may reflect a hypervigilance to OITs. Mindfulness-based prevention and intervention for OCD should be tailored to take account of the potential differential effects of increasing specific facets of mindfulness.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Linken_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1170en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1180en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMindfulnessen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106en_US
dc.titleWhich facets of mindfulness protect individuals from the negative experiences of obsessive intrusive thoughts?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record