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dc.contributor.authorTao, Yiqien_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorGou, Zhonghuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFu, Jiayanen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Boyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xiaoweien_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-04T12:39:23Z
dc.date.available2019-07-04T12:39:23Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph15102157en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380688
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to understand the relationship between bedroom privacy and well-being of the elderly in aged care facilities with a compact living situation. A majority of studies on this topic were carried out in a low-density population context. The crowded living situation might compromise the well-being of residents. This study proposed five architectural parameters to measure bedroom privacy in aged care facilities: total open surface per unit, openness/solid ratio per bed, height of partition wall, number of people per unit, and personal control over bedroom privacy. SF-12 v.2 Health Survey was used to collect information on physical and mental health status. The study surveyed nine Care & Attention homes and their 213 residents in Hong Kong. The total open surface per unit and the openness/solid ratio per bed were positively associated with the physical health of residents. The height of partition walls was associated negatively with their physical and mental health conditions, and the number of people per unit was negatively associated with their physical health. More than half of respondents preferred a single unit with high partition walls; however, 40% of respondents preferred low partition walls. The provision of privacy for the elderly should be balanced with their needs for social interactions; total open surface per unit, openness/solid ratio per bed and height of partition wall should be taken into consideration. The study provides evidence and design guidelines for improving privacy in aged care facilities with a compact living environment.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter2157en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto14en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMultidisciplinaryen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode059999en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcodeMDen_US
dc.titlePrivacy and Well-Being in Aged Care Facilities with a Crowded Living Environment: Case Study of Hong Kong Care and Attention Homesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
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