Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Kate
dc.contributor.authorEwart, Jacqui
dc.contributor.authorChrzanowski, April
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-29T12:38:18Z
dc.date.available2019-05-29T12:38:18Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2077-1444
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/rel9100319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/380931
dc.description.abstractThis study emerged from an incidental, and somewhat surprising, finding that 15 percent of working journalists who attend training on improving the ways that mainstream new media report stories about Islam and Muslims, wrongly associated Sikhism with Islam. We wondered if this was indicative of the Australian population and, through a random stratified survey of the Australian population, found that it was. The question about the extent to which populations wrongly associate Sikhism with Islam is an important one. In Australia, Muslims and Sikhs are minorities. Ignorance of Islam and its religious diversity coupled with ignorance of Muslims and their ethnic and cultural diversity underpins the intolerance of Islam in the West and the concomitant animus directed at Muslims. Intolerance and violence directed at Muslims and people wrongly assumed to be Muslims (such as Sikhs) increased after the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001 (9/11). This speaks to religious literacy, the treatment of religious minorities and raises important questions around educating various publics (including the news media) about both Islam and Sikhism. It also speaks to the role of the mainstream news media in perpetuating Islamophobia, and its detrimental flow-on effects to Muslims and Sikhs.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherM D P I AG
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
dc.relation.ispartofchapter319
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto16
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalReligions
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunication and Media Studies not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200199
dc.title''Don't Freak We're Sikh'' - A Study of the Extent to Which Australian Journalists and the Australian Public Wrongly Associate Sikhism with Islam
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorO'Donnell, Kate
gro.griffith.authorChrzanowski, April P.
gro.griffith.authorEwart, Jacqueline A.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record